No Fish! No Food!

MARINE BIOLOGY ROCKS!

39 notes

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)
Crown jellyfish like this one (Netrostoma setouchina), are eight families of jellyfish that belong to the order Coronatae. They are distinguished from other jellyfish by the presence of a deep groove running around the umbrella, giving them the crown shape from which they take their name. Many of the species in the order inhabit deep sea environments. For more on jellyfish see this previous post.
(Source)

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)

Crown jellyfish like this one (Netrostoma setouchina), are eight families of jellyfish that belong to the order Coronatae. They are distinguished from other jellyfish by the presence of a deep groove running around the umbrella, giving them the crown shape from which they take their name. Many of the species in the order inhabit deep sea environments. For more on jellyfish see this previous post.

(Source)

95 notes

animalworld:

HYDROMEDUSA ©Ingo Arndt
rhamphotheca:

Translucent Ocean Creatures:  Antarctic Hydromedusa (photo: Ingo Arndt)
A hydromedusa spreads its luminescent tentacles in the Weddell Sea near Antarctica. (via: National Geo)

animalworld:

HYDROMEDUSA ©Ingo Arndt

rhamphotheca:

Translucent Ocean Creatures:  Antarctic Hydromedusa (photo: Ingo Arndt)

A hydromedusa spreads its luminescent tentacles in the Weddell Sea near Antarctica. (via: National Geo)

1,511 notes

animalworld:

FLOWER HAT JELLYFISH - © trinko
The flower hat jelly (Olindias formosa) is a rare species of jellyfish occurring primarily in waters off Brazil, Argentina, and southern Japan. Characterized by lustrous tentacles  that coil and adhere to its rim when not in use, the flower hat jelly’s  bell is translucent and pinstriped with opaque bands, making it easily  recognizable.
The flower hat jelly can grow to be about 15cm (6 inches) in diameter. Its sting is painful but non-lethal to humans. Its diet consists mostly of small fish.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower_hat_jelly
Other photos you may enjoy:
Spanish Shawl Nudibranch
Crown of Thorns Starfish
Arctic Anemones and Soft Corals under Norway

animalworld:

FLOWER HAT JELLYFISH - © trinko

The flower hat jelly (Olindias formosa) is a rare species of jellyfish occurring primarily in waters off Brazil, Argentina, and southern Japan. Characterized by lustrous tentacles that coil and adhere to its rim when not in use, the flower hat jelly’s bell is translucent and pinstriped with opaque bands, making it easily recognizable.

The flower hat jelly can grow to be about 15cm (6 inches) in diameter. Its sting is painful but non-lethal to humans. Its diet consists mostly of small fish.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower_hat_jelly

Other photos you may enjoy:

Spanish Shawl Nudibranch

Crown of Thorns Starfish

Arctic Anemones and Soft Corals under Norway

(Source: zealander)

171 notes

animalworld:

BOX JELLYFISH - Eye Evolution?
madasamarinebiologist:

fybiology:

Did you know box jellyfish have eyes? These 24 photographic lens eyes are unique among Cnidarians and are thought to represent the early evolution of the lens eye. Members of the genus Tripedalia, which live among mangrove tree roots, are thought to use these eyes in obstacle avoidance.
- Brad

 Who knew?!

animalworld:

BOX JELLYFISH - Eye Evolution?

madasamarinebiologist:

fybiology:

Did you know box jellyfish have eyes? These 24 photographic lens eyes are unique among Cnidarians and are thought to represent the early evolution of the lens eye. Members of the genus Tripedalia, which live among mangrove tree roots, are thought to use these eyes in obstacle avoidance.

- Brad

 Who knew?!

187 notes

animalworld:

THE BLUE BUTTON - (Porpita porpita)
©David Liittschwager/Marine Microfauna
The blue button lives on the surface of the sea and consists of two  main parts: the float and the hydroid colony. The hard central float is round, almost flat, and is about one inch wide. The hydroid  colony, which can range from bright blue turquoise to yellow, resembles  tentacles like those of the jellyfish.   Each strand has numerous branchlets, each of which ends in knobs of stinging cells called nematocysts. The blue button sting is not powerful but may cause irritation if it comes in contact with human skin.
It plays a role in the food web, as its size makes it easy prey for  several organisms. The blue button itself is a passive drifter, meaning  that it feeds on both living and dead organisms that come in contact  with it. It competes with other drifters for food and mainly feeds off  of small fish, eggs, and zooplankton.  The blue button has a single mouth located beneath the float which is  used for both the intake of nutrients as well as the expulsion of  wastes.
For more amazing Marine Microfauna Photos, visit David’s site here
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porpita_porpita
Other photos you may enjoy:
‘Bomb Dropping’ Swima Worm
JellyfIsh Eyes
Flower Hat Jellyfish

animalworld:

THE BLUE BUTTON - (Porpita porpita)

©David Liittschwager/Marine Microfauna

The blue button lives on the surface of the sea and consists of two main parts: the float and the hydroid colony. The hard central float is round, almost flat, and is about one inch wide. The hydroid colony, which can range from bright blue turquoise to yellow, resembles tentacles like those of the jellyfish.   Each strand has numerous branchlets, each of which ends in knobs of stinging cells called nematocysts. The blue button sting is not powerful but may cause irritation if it comes in contact with human skin.

It plays a role in the food web, as its size makes it easy prey for several organisms. The blue button itself is a passive drifter, meaning that it feeds on both living and dead organisms that come in contact with it. It competes with other drifters for food and mainly feeds off of small fish, eggs, and zooplankton. The blue button has a single mouth located beneath the float which is used for both the intake of nutrients as well as the expulsion of wastes.

For more amazing Marine Microfauna Photos, visit David’s site here

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porpita_porpita

Other photos you may enjoy:

‘Bomb Dropping’ Swima Worm

JellyfIsh Eyes

Flower Hat Jellyfish

Filed under Blue Button Porpita Porpita David Liitschwager Marine Life Marine Microfauna Wildlife Photography

166 notes

animalworld:

PORTUGUESE MAN O’ WAR (Physalia physalis)
The Portuguese man o’ war, also known as the Portuguese man-of-war, man-of-war, or bluebottle, is a venomous  jelly-like marine invertebrate of the family Physaliidae. 
The name “man-of-war” is borrowed from the man-of-war, an 16th century English armed sailing ship.
Despite its outward appearance, the man-of-war is not a true jellyfish but a siphonophore, which differ from jellyfish in that they are not actually a single creature, but a colonial organism made up of many minute individuals called zooids. 
Each zooids  is a highly-specialized solitary animal, attached to each other and physiologically  integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent  survival.
The man-of-war is found in warm water seas floating on the surface of  open ocean, its air bladder keeping it afloat and acting as a sail  while the rest of the organism hangs below the surface. 
It has no means  of self-propulsion and is entirely dependent on winds, currents, and  tides. 
It is most common in the tropical and subtropical regions of the  Pacific and Indian oceans, but can drift outside of this range on warm  currents such as the Atlantic Gulf Stream.
The Portuguese Man o’ War is responsible for up to 10,000 human stings in Australia each summer, particularly on the east coast, with some others occurring off the coast of South Australia and Western Australia.  
 The stinging venom-filled nematocysts in the tentacles of the Portuguese Man o’ War can paralyze small fish  and other prey. 
Detached tentacles and dead specimens (including those  that wash up on shore) can sting just as painfully as the live creature  in the water, and may remain potent for hours or even days after the  death of the creature or the detachment of the tentacle.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_Man_o%27_War
Other photos you may enjoy:
Textile Cone Snail (venomous)
Lemon Shark

animalworld:

PORTUGUESE MAN O’ WAR (Physalia physalis)

  • The Portuguese man o’ war, also known as the Portuguese man-of-war, man-of-war, or bluebottle, is a venomous  jelly-like marine invertebrate of the family Physaliidae.
  • The name “man-of-war” is borrowed from the man-of-war, an 16th century English armed sailing ship.
  • Despite its outward appearance, the man-of-war is not a true jellyfish but a siphonophore, which differ from jellyfish in that they are not actually a single creature, but a colonial organism made up of many minute individuals called zooids.
  • Each zooids is a highly-specialized solitary animal, attached to each other and physiologically integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent survival.
  • The man-of-war is found in warm water seas floating on the surface of open ocean, its air bladder keeping it afloat and acting as a sail while the rest of the organism hangs below the surface.
  • It has no means of self-propulsion and is entirely dependent on winds, currents, and tides.
  • It is most common in the tropical and subtropical regions of the Pacific and Indian oceans, but can drift outside of this range on warm currents such as the Atlantic Gulf Stream.
  • The Portuguese Man o’ War is responsible for up to 10,000 human stings in Australia each summer, particularly on the east coast, with some others occurring off the coast of South Australia and Western Australia.  
  • The stinging venom-filled nematocysts in the tentacles of the Portuguese Man o’ War can paralyze small fish and other prey.
  • Detached tentacles and dead specimens (including those that wash up on shore) can sting just as painfully as the live creature in the water, and may remain potent for hours or even days after the death of the creature or the detachment of the tentacle.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_Man_o%27_War

Other photos you may enjoy:

Textile Cone Snail (venomous)

Lemon Shark

Filed under Portuguese Man O War venomous Marine Life Photography

92 notes

animalworld:

BLOOD RED JELLYFISH (Crossota norvegica) - ©Kevin Raskov
Other Photos you may enjoy:
Portuguese man o’war
Blue Button (Porpita porpita)
Flower Hat Jelly
—-
findout:

Blood-red Crossota norvegica jellyfish.  It was spotted by a remotely operated vehicle 8,530 feet (2,600 meters) underwater in a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expedition to the Canada Basin, the deepest and least explored part of the Arctic waters. 
Kevin Raskov.    thanks to findlilyhere for the link

animalworld:

BLOOD RED JELLYFISH (Crossota norvegica) - ©Kevin Raskov

Other Photos you may enjoy:

Portuguese man o’war

Blue Button (Porpita porpita)

Flower Hat Jelly

—-

findout:

Blood-red Crossota norvegica jellyfishIt was spotted by a remotely operated vehicle 8,530 feet (2,600 meters) underwater in a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expedition to the Canada Basin, the deepest and least explored part of the Arctic waters. 

Kevin Raskov.    thanks to findlilyhere for the link

198 notes

animalworld:

AUSTRALIAN SPOTTED JELLYFISH or WHITE SPOTTED JELLYFISHPhyllorhiza punctata ©cheesekid
This gorgeous shot was taken at the Monterey Bay Aquarium 
Phyllorhiza punctata is a species of jellyfish, also known as the Australian spotted jellyfish or the White-spotted jellyfish.  It is native to the southwestern Pacific, where it feeds primarily on  zooplankton. P. punctata average 45-50 cm in bell diameter but there had  been a maximum reported size of 62 cm. However, in October, 2007, one  72 cm. wide, perhaps the largest ever recorded, was found on Sunset  Beach, NC. In July 2007 smaller ones were seen in Bogue Sound much  further north along the North Carolina Coast. They have only a mild  venom and are not considered a threat to humans. However, their ability  to consume plankton and the eggs and larvae of important fish species is  cause for concern. Each jellyfish can filter as much as 13,200 gallons  of sea water per day. While doing that, it ingests the plankton that  native species need.
True jellyfish, Phylum Cnidaria, go through a two stage life cycle which  consists of a medusa stage (adult) and a polyp stage (juvenile). In the  medusa stage male jellyfish release sperm into the water column and the  female jellyfish gathers the sperm into her mouth where she holds the  eggs. Once fertilization occurs and larvae are formed they leave their  mother and settle to the ocean floor. Once on the bottom a polyp form  occurs and this form reproduces asexually by “cloning” or dividing  itself into other polyps. Jellyfish can live for up to five years in the  polyp stage and up to two years in the medusa stage.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllorhiza_punctata
Other posts:
Purple Striped Jelly
Blue Button
Blood-Red Jelly

animalworld:

AUSTRALIAN SPOTTED JELLYFISH or WHITE SPOTTED JELLYFISH
Phyllorhiza punctata
 ©cheesekid

This gorgeous shot was taken at the Monterey Bay Aquarium

Phyllorhiza punctata is a species of jellyfish, also known as the Australian spotted jellyfish or the White-spotted jellyfish. It is native to the southwestern Pacific, where it feeds primarily on zooplankton. P. punctata average 45-50 cm in bell diameter but there had been a maximum reported size of 62 cm. However, in October, 2007, one 72 cm. wide, perhaps the largest ever recorded, was found on Sunset Beach, NC. In July 2007 smaller ones were seen in Bogue Sound much further north along the North Carolina Coast. They have only a mild venom and are not considered a threat to humans. However, their ability to consume plankton and the eggs and larvae of important fish species is cause for concern. Each jellyfish can filter as much as 13,200 gallons of sea water per day. While doing that, it ingests the plankton that native species need.

True jellyfish, Phylum Cnidaria, go through a two stage life cycle which consists of a medusa stage (adult) and a polyp stage (juvenile). In the medusa stage male jellyfish release sperm into the water column and the female jellyfish gathers the sperm into her mouth where she holds the eggs. Once fertilization occurs and larvae are formed they leave their mother and settle to the ocean floor. Once on the bottom a polyp form occurs and this form reproduces asexually by “cloning” or dividing itself into other polyps. Jellyfish can live for up to five years in the polyp stage and up to two years in the medusa stage.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllorhiza_punctata

Other posts:

Purple Striped Jelly

Blue Button

Blood-Red Jelly

Filed under Australian Spotted Jellyfish Animal White Spotted Jellyfish Jellyfish Phyllorhiza punctata Cheesekid Australia US Invader Marine Life Wildlife Nature Photography theanimalblog

88 notes

animalworld:

PURPLE-STRIPED JELLY (Chrysaora colorata)  -  ©lemurdillo
The purple-striped jelly is a species of jellyfish that exists primarily off the coast of California in Monterey Bay.  The bell (body) of the jellyfish is up to 70 cm (27.6 inches or 2.3  feet) in diameter, typically with a radial pattern of stripes. The  tentacles vary with the age of the individual, consisting typically of  eight marginal long dark arms, and four central frilly oral arms. It is  closely studied by scientists due to not much being known about their  eating habits.  
Often cancer crabs make home in the jellyfish and eat the parasitic amphipods that feed on and damage the jelly.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysaora_colorata
Other images you may enjoy:
Portuguese Man ‘o War
Blue Button
Blood-Red Jelly

animalworld:

PURPLE-STRIPED JELLY (Chrysaora colorata)  -  ©lemurdillo

The purple-striped jelly is a species of jellyfish that exists primarily off the coast of California in Monterey Bay. The bell (body) of the jellyfish is up to 70 cm (27.6 inches or 2.3 feet) in diameter, typically with a radial pattern of stripes. The tentacles vary with the age of the individual, consisting typically of eight marginal long dark arms, and four central frilly oral arms. It is closely studied by scientists due to not much being known about their eating habits.  

Often cancer crabs make home in the jellyfish and eat the parasitic amphipods that feed on and damage the jelly.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysaora_colorata

Other images you may enjoy:

Portuguese Man ‘o War

Blue Button

Blood-Red Jelly

Filed under Animals Chrysaora colorata Purple Striped Jelly Fish Wildlife jellyfish lemurdillo marine life nature Photography